• 27 Dec 2020 2:10 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Please note your affiliation and years of experience in the energy and/or environmental field.

    I am an energy economist and statistician with over a decade of experience, currently employed at the engineering consulting firm Tetra Tech. I am also a non-resident energy transitions fellow at UT Austin’s Energy Institute and an adjunct professor at the University of Maryland, College Park and the School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University, where I teach graduate classes in energy policy and economics. 

    Any particular achievement/interest in the energy/environment space that you would like to mention? 

    I am passionate about artificial intelligence and believe it is a general purpose technology, with the potential to revolutionize our society, akin to how the invention of the steam powered engine changed society during the Industrial Revolution. To highlight AI applications in the energy field, I recently organized a series of USAEE webinars with academic speakers and practitioners of AI.

    In your opinion, what are the important issues facing the energy industry today? 

    I recently completed a review study, commissioned by the Estonian Government, that found that the world is likely to fall short of its mid-century climate commitments to keep global temperature increases below 2 degrees Celsius. I believe that AI could be the driving force for closing this gap, allowing us to protect our climate and further economic growth at the same time. In a way, it could allow us to “have our cake and eat it, too.” I am seeking to better understand how future technological advancements and potential Black Swan events impact the global energy landscape. Just as the pandemic was a ‘negative’ Black Swan that sets us back, technological discoveries like AI can be seen as a Black Swan with a tremendous positive influence. In my latest research, I suggest that energy modellers and scenario planners need to pay more attention to such extreme events. They are much more likely than we commonly think.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I first became a member of USAEE in 2013. In recent years, I have been involved with USAEE as a council member and a committee member. I was curious about joining a local chapter and when the pandemic hit I decided to join NCAC, because I did not want to lose connection to people working in energy in the DC Capital region. Coincidentally, I was recently contemplating whether we have reached ‘peak oil’ this year. That same week I received an email from NCAC about a webinar that addresses that exact topic (it involved BP’s Chief US Economist Michael Cohen). It was an excellent discussion and demonstrated how timely and relevant NCAC events are.

        


  • 14 Nov 2020 1:01 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Please note your affiliation and experience in the energy and/or environmental field.

    I am the Army Secretariat’s Special Assistant for Energy and Sustainability, and have been working in the energy field, environmental field, and at the energy-environmental seams for about 17 years (including graduate school).

    I spent my mid-twenties as an environmental project engineer (often at construction and industrial facilities), over five years as an academic researcher evaluating the life-cycle environmental and economic trade-offs associated with scaling up alternative fuels infrastructure, and the last seven years as an advisor and program manager for the military’s energy technology development and installation resilience initiatives.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    One of my richest career experiences was serving as the Executive Secretary for the Defense Science Board’s Task Force on Energy Systems for Forward and Remote Operating Bases, which was stood up after the Senate requested the DoD to evaluate the feasibility of “micro” nuclear reactors.

    In this role, I invited experts from the U.S. Government, DOE’s national labs, and private sector to share insights on energy technologies, reactor licensing, military operations, international logistics, and many other topics to inform the Task Force’s recommendations to the DoD on whether and how to support the development of micronuclear reactors. The costs and benefits of adopting these recommendations remain controversial, so I have enjoyed monitoring progress and discussions on this topic for the last seven years.

    In your opinion, what are important issues facing the energy industry today?

    Energy analysts will need to be attentive to the ever-evolving and situation-specific notion of a “functional unit” for energy.  I’m as guilty as anyone of using kilowatt-hours to represent electrical service, and gasoline-gallon-equivalents to represent transportation service; however, as we continue diversifying energy resources and developing business models that better articulate how we define energy services, it will be challenging to ensure metrics remain relevant.

    As we revise energy and environmental policies, we must appreciate the interconnected nature of energy throughout the economy, as changes to energy prices and availability have a variety of impacts to quality of life both domestically and internationally.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC?

    I have been an enthusiastic, dues-paying member of the NCAC-USAEE since 2016.

    Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I first learned of NCAC shortly after I moved to DC as an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science & Technology Policy Fellow, when I started out as an advisor for DoD’s alternative fuels policies, R&D efforts, and procurement initiatives.

    My supervisor forwarded me an invitation to attend a NCAC-USAEE presentation on military biofuels by Joel Yudken (who I later learned is a NCAC member extraordinaire).  After cold-emailing the presenter, I soon learned that Joel is also an alumni of the AAAS Fellowship.  After paying the noncommittal person’s premium to attend a few lunch seminars, Joel helped convince me to make the economically rational decision to become a member.

  • 17 Oct 2020 12:55 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Please note your affiliation and years of experience in the energy and/or environmental field.

    I am Managing Director of Energy Markets, Analysis, and Standards at the American Gas Association. I began my work in the energy and environmental field 15 years ago within the Global Environmental Politics program within the School of International Service at American University. Before AGA, I was worked with the Fuels and Technology team at ICF on a range of natural gas and propane market modeling, analyses, and climate-related projects. Today, I work with a team at AGA to advance market and policy research and stakeholder engagement to support the Association’s outreach to advance the awareness of the vital role that natural gas utilities serve in meeting the needs of a clean energy economy.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    One accomplishment I was proud of in 2019 and 2020 was the advancement of AGA’s commitments to address climate change. In January 2020, AGA released a Position Statement on Climate Change. It included a set of collective commitments from AGA and the natural gas utility industry to contribute to a significantly lower-carbon energy economy. I’ve been proud of our team’s work in advancing and operationalizing these commitments by developing analytics and policy considerations for the role of natural gas and natural gas infrastructure to achieve greenhouse gas emissions reductions.  This work has and will continue to require careful analysis and stakeholder engagement across several issue areas, including energy efficiency, greenhouse gas emissions, renewable gases, reliability and resilience, the potential of advanced natural gas technologies, and building energy codes and standards.

    In your opinion, what are important issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    How we produce and use energy is changing so quickly. One of the primary drivers of this change is concern about the environment and climate change. Unfortunately, in the public debate about reducing emissions, in some cases, the opportunities to achieve reductions through innovation across the natural gas industry are sometimes dismissed. I’m working to address this challenge. We need good analysis and new perspectives to inform the policy discussion about the role and the value of gas and gas infrastructure in creating a safe, reliable, affordable, vibrant, and significantly lower-carbon energy economy.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I have been a member of NCAC for ten years. Although I’m afraid I am finding it challenging to pick one memory among the many. I will say I always enjoy the annual dinners, especially the terrific speakers and getting to see everyone. I’m looking forward to the next one!

  • 12 Sep 2020 12:52 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Please note your affiliation and years of experience in the energy and/or environmental field.

    I have been analyzing international trade of energy products for almost four years at the U.S. International Trade Commission. My portfolio covers a wide range of energy sources (including fossil fuels and their derivatives, uranium, and electrical energy) but most frequently looks at trade of crude oil, natural gas, and their midstream and downstream products. Before working at the USITC, I also interned for oil and gas analysts at the U.S. Department of Commerce and International Technology and Trade Associates (ITTA).

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    I am currently leading a project focused on electricity markets in New England, developing a report that will be delivered to the House Committee on Ways and Means early next year.

    In your opinion, what are important issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    Obviously, one of the major questions right now is how the industry weathers the pandemic. But it also seems that the energy industry is at a crossroads as far as how it manages increasing pressure to reduce its environmental footprint. While the U.S. industry is competitive at supplying some relatively low emission fossil fuel products like natural gas, propane, and ultra-low sulfur diesel, more and more policy goals are calling for rapid paths to carbon neutrality rather than incremental reductions in emissions intensity.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I have been a member of NCAC for about three years. In 2018, I participated in both the technical tour of the National Energy Technology Laboratory and Longview Power Plant and the tour of Marcellus Shale. The tour of Longview Power Plant was particularly interesting—while the plant operators touted its performance as a high efficiency, low emissions coal plant, the plant’s financial performance was a murkier story. Since our visit, Longview Power has emerged from a second bankruptcy and announced plans to add a gas-fired plant and solar panels at the site.

  • 15 Aug 2020 12:48 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Please note your affiliation and years of experience in the energy and/or environmental field.

    I am currently a graduate student at Georgetown pursuing a dual Master’s program at the Business School and the School of Foreign Service. Prior to graduate school, I spent four years working with Deloitte and other organizations doing international development consulting with USAID, the Department of State, and other agencies. This work encompassed oil and gas development, renewable energy, and utilities management.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    Under a project with USAID and later the Department of State, my team conducted analysis of economic and technical viability of non-heavy fuel oil energy sources that led to a $25 million loan guarantee for a financial institution in Jamaica covering a portfolio of alternative energy investments in the country.

    In your opinion, what are important issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    I approach the energy industry through the lens of international development: energy is essential for human wellbeing by unleashing agricultural productivity, powering manufacturing sectors, driving transportation, and enabling the delivery of health services. However, nearly a billion people in the world still lack access to electricity, and for billions of people with access, supply is intermittent and unreliable. In the coming years, the great challenge will therefore be balancing the need to satisfy the growing demand for energy worldwide against our planet’s ecological limitations.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    This is my first year with NCAC! I’m looking forward to learning from all of you and sharing my own experiences in turn.

  • 16 May 2020 12:41 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Please note your affiliation and years of experience in the energy and/or environmental field

    Affiliation: Managing Member of New Tide Asset Management, LLC, a proprietary trading and investment company focused on energy and commodity markets, and macro trading.

    Experience: Began working on energy issues as a graduate student over 30 years ago and have spent most years since focused on commodity trading and energy investment, especially in emerging markets.  Lived and worked in Russia for seven years in the 1990s, and in the 2010s taught award winning courses on the geopolitics of energy, and scenario planning at Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs.

    Any particular interest in energy you would like to mention?

    Currently, spends a great deal of time looking for trading and investment opportunities around the evolution of U.S. energy policy and the transition to lower carbon fuels, especially in the automotive and power sectors.

    In your opinion, what are important issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    The United States and the world confront an alarming challenge in navigating the energy transition.   Appropriate public policies and sufficient time are necessary to decarbonize the energy sector and provide everyone, especially the billions of people suffering from energy deprivation or poverty, with needed energy.   A deeply polarized political climate has made rational discourse difficult, and this is exacerbated by the conflation by some of climate policy with other issues such as political and economic system transformation.  Managing the energy transition without unnecessarily and counter-productively destroying or debilitating hundreds of billions, if not trillions of dollars of existing energy infrastructure is imperative, if the world is to have affordable and secure energy in the future.  It is very easy to tear things down; it is great deal harder to build something new and better. In the interim, greater efforts at adaptations to climate change probably would be a very prudent policy course.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    Jonathan joined the NCAC after moving to Washington, D.C. three years ago and being invited to an NCAC Happy Hour.  At this very first encounter, Jonathan said he “found a smart group of people with a common passion for things energy, and a diversity of views on all the critical issues.”   Going to the meetings and events “expands my understanding of energy issues and helps me appreciate more aspects of our energy challenge.”

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software