• 1 Dec 2015 12:23 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Management Analyst at Enegis LLC, On-site contractor in the Office of Fossil Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    I am a Management Analyst working on-site in the Office of Fossil Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy with Enegis LLC. Through this work with DOE, I help to collect and analyze U.S. natural gas export and import data from U.S. companies, foreign suppliers, and trading partners such as Canada, Mexico, Trinidad and Tobago, Japan, and Taiwan, to name a few. Collectively, I have over six years of direct energy industry experience gained in both the U.S. Government and private sector. I have conducted extensive legislative reviews of several energy and environmental bills and acts, including the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009, Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007, and the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Additionally, I also have experience in the international trade and development field, with my energy and international trade interests often overlapping. For example, I helped to promote U.S. export growth by providing international trade and economic data research and analysis while on a graduate school position at the U.S. Department of Commerce, and I also coordinated the monitoring and evaluation of U.S. investments in emerging markets during a graduate school position at OPIC (Overseas Private Investment Corporation). The ability of the United States to export natural gas creates a combination of energy and international trade synergies.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    Two achievements and areas of interest come to mind when thinking about my professional and personal experience:

    Providing accurate and timely U.S. natural gas export and import data to the U.S. Department of Energy and interested parties to ensure U.S. policymakers are able to make the most challenging decisions to drive both the U.S. economy and U.S. foreign policy interests forward.; and

    Combining my energy and international trade interests to increase U.S. and global living standards by way of appropriate levels of international trade in energy as well as to ensure adequate gas supplies to continue fueling a rebirth in U.S. manufacturing.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    A major economic and policy issue facing the energy industry today is how to get it right with respect to end users of the abundance of U.S. natural gas. In short, is the excess stock of natural gas better used as an export commodity to help U.S. friends and allies, or better used by retaining the gas to lower domestic manufacturing costs and thus increase U.S. employment levels?

    The answer to this question will likely have a mix of both; the real challenge is figuring out the right allocation of gas to satisfy both domestic economic uses as well as international foreign policy aims. Also key to note, is whether the political will exists for decision makers to reach a consensus in which likely no stakeholder receives everything they wish.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I have been a member of the NCAC since 2009. Put into broader perspective, the NCAC is like an extended family for everyone involved. From the monthly lunchtime presentations and discussions to the conversations at NCAC after working hours events, the NCAC has always been a place where committed individuals come together to discuss the challenging energy issues of the day. I became a member of the NCAC while still a student in George Mason University’s masters of international commerce and policy program. Through the NCAC, I have had the pleasure of learning and growing in the energy industry from both the student and professional level perspectives.

  • 1 Nov 2015 11:57 PM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Advisor on Energy Regulatory Policy and Management

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    I am an independent consultant having had 45 years of management and consulting experience with energy business and regulatory authorities in 39 countries, including resident assignments in India, Romania and Tanzania. From 1992-2002, I was a senior manager for Price Waterhouse and a project manager for Bechtel Consulting. My work focused on developing regulatory environments in emerging and transitional economies that fostered free markets for energy and attracted private sector investment. Prior to 2002, my focus was the US natural gas industry where I was an economic analyst for American Natural Gas, a senior consultant for Stone & Webster Management Consultants, and manager of economic analyses for the Columbia Gas Distribution Companies. My involvement in the energy sector began in 1971 when, on active duty with the U.S. Navy, I was assigned as an energy and environmental policy analyst at the Center for Naval Analyses.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    Of many projects, two come to mind as being particularly constructive:

    In 2006-7, I was the first Director of Regulatory Economics for the newly established multi-sector regulator in Tanzania; among my responsibilities was the development of rules and procedures for tariff evaluations. I’m proud to have been quite literally “present at the creation” of what has become one of Africa’s most successful energy regulators.

    From 1997-2002, I was country manager for several central and eastern European countries, organizing multi-disciplinary projects that drafted energy laws and developed regulatory capacity supporting the transition from controlled to free markets for electricity and natural gas. The subsequent EU accession of these nations reflects the success of that transition and is a story in which I’m very proud to have played a part.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    Throughout my career I’ve observed the tension between energy initiatives and environmental concerns. While often frustrating, constructive dialogues have nonetheless produced benefits for our national economy and our environment. More recently, however, is a tendency to politicize this tension with proponents for either side seeming to argue their case without regard to the possibility that arguments inconsistent with the position of their party and its supporters might also be meritorious. The protracted debate over the Keystone Pipeline is one of many examples of an unwillingness to find a cooperative basis for going forward. Overcoming political intransigence is the greatest challenge I see to developing and implementing rational policies for the best use of our energy resources and the protection of our environment.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I’ve been a member of NCAC since 1999 and a member of IAEE/USAEE since 1991. Being a member of this family of organizations has been a richly rewarding experience. Of many great times we’ve shared, I recall as particularly enjoyable our overnight field trip to see Drake’s Well in Titusville, Pennsylvania, on its 150th anniversary. Events of this kind, our annual Washington Energy Policy Conference and our program of monthly luncheons with outstanding speakers has justifiably made NCAC the largest and most active of the USAEE chapters.

  • 1 Oct 2015 12:28 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Counsel, Regulatory Policy for GE

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    I was first exposed to energy and environment issues five years ago while still a recent law graduate on Capitol Hill, but started working on these issues in earnest when I joined GE four years ago. GE provides technology and services across practically the entire breadth of the energy sector, and the company deals with environmental issues through its business and as a manufacturer.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    I’m proud of the work we have done with regard to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Not only is this policy area evolving in real time, but addressing climate challenges requires blue sky thinking and a desire to innovate. This means working with stakeholders in the energy sector and governments to identify practical and economical steps we can take today. I am impressed by the degree of policy entrepreneurship I have seen in this space, and I’m grateful to work on these issues at this particular moment in time.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    In the U.S., energy and environmental policy are highly intertwined. The energy industry will face major regulatory challenges as governments here and abroad try to tackle the big environmental issues of the day. Here, I think we have placed an emphasis on climate issues and the extraction/use of fossil fuels. Other countries may just now be dealing with some of the issues we first faced as early as the 1950s. For countries like China and India we see real tension between economic growth and raised standard of living versus the impacts of what we’d consider to be basic environmental problems like addressing “criteria” air pollutants. Underneath each country’s unique circumstances is the fundamental question of what energy means to our lives and livelihoods.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I have been a member for about a year and a half, and (like others) have found the events and speakers to be interesting and thoughtful. I’m looking forward to getting to know the group much more in the coming year.

  • 1 Sep 2015 12:02 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Advisor on Energy Regulatory Policy and Management

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    I am an independent consultant having had 45 years of management and consulting experience with energy business and regulatory authorities in 39 countries, including resident assignments in India, Romania and Tanzania. From 1992-2002, I was a senior manager for Price Waterhouse and a project manager for Bechtel Consulting. My work focused on developing regulatory environments in emerging and transitional economies that fostered free markets for energy and attracted private sector investment. Prior to 2002, my focus was the US natural gas industry where I was an economic analyst for American Natural Gas, a senior consultant for Stone & Webster Management Consultants, and manager of economic analyses for the Columbia Gas Distribution Companies. My involvement in the energy sector began in 1971 when, on active duty with the U.S. Navy, I was assigned as an energy and environmental policy analyst at the Center for Naval Analyses.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    Of many projects, two come to mind as being particularly constructive:

    In 2006-7, I was the first Director of Regulatory Economics for the newly established multi-sector regulator in Tanzania; among my responsibilities was the development of rules and procedures for tariff evaluations. I’m proud to have been quite literally “present at the creation” of what has become one of Africa’s most successful energy regulators.

    From 1997-2002, I was country manager for several central and eastern European countries, organizing multi-disciplinary projects that drafted energy laws and developed regulatory capacity supporting the transition from controlled to free markets for electricity and natural gas. The subsequent EU accession of these nations reflects the success of that transition and is a story in which I’m very proud to have played a part.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    Throughout my career I’ve observed the tension between energy initiatives and environmental concerns. While often frustrating, constructive dialogues have nonetheless produced benefits for our national economy and our environment. More recently, however, is a tendency to politicize this tension with proponents for either side seeming to argue their case without regard to the possibility that arguments inconsistent with the position of their party and its supporters might also be meritorious. The protracted debate over the Keystone Pipeline is one of many examples of an unwillingness to find a cooperative basis for going forward. Overcoming political intransigence is the greatest challenge I see to developing and implementing rational policies for the best use of our energy resources and the protection of our environment.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I’ve been a member of NCAC since 1999 and a member of IAEE/USAEE since 1991. Being a member of this family of organizations has been a richly rewarding experience. Of many great times we’ve shared, I recall as particularly enjoyable our overnight field trip to see Drake’s Well in Titusville, Pennsylvania, on its 150th anniversary. Events of this kind, our annual Washington Energy Policy Conference and our program of monthly luncheons with outstanding speakers has justifiably made NCAC the largest and most actSenior Analyst with EDF Renewable Energy and former Officer of NCAC

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    I started working in the energy field 7 years ago when I joined EDF Group, a French utility with a large international presence (it's actually the world's largest power company in terms of generated electricity) and covering every aspect of the power sector from generation (nuclear, renewables,..) to transmission and distribution, and trading. It was actually my first job as a young graduate after a series of internships in non-energy fields, and also my first job in the U.S. (I was born and raised in Europe). I still remember the excitement of the first few days as a power market analyst and guess what...fast-forward 7 years, I am still as excited and passionate about this industry. Individually, our roles may be limited (sometimes to spreadsheets, data gathering and rule reading) but collectively our industry has a real impact on people's lives and sustains a nation's economic growth and quality of life.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    I joined EDF Renewable Energy in 2012 and have since worked on topics like renewable integration and grid congestion. We are using a very sophisticated production cost simulation model to assess transmission and congestion risks for our projects. It has been quite a journey to develop my modeling skills and expertise, and it feels like an achievement to have the deep understanding of the power markets that comes with simulating a power market based on a myriad set of assumptions on supply stack, demand growth, fuel prices etc...

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    I think the greatest challenge for our industry is to determine the right set of today's actions for tomorrow and many years to come. There will always be bad choices, bad policies and conflicting interests but we need to face and address the issues that come up with necessary reform and changes. Growing global demand and climate change will require huge investments from the industry but those cannot happen without appropriate market signals.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I started attending NCAC luncheons in 2008 and it's been the best thing ever for me as a young professional, new to the city and the industry. NCAC is really a great association where you can learn and discuss with other seasoned or young professionals of diverse backgrounds and experiences, while developing friendships and a professional network. It is also a place where you get what you give in the sense that you are never too young to volunteer, be part of the NCAC council and grow in leadership. I have many great memories from my several years as a council member and Officer of NCAC; fieldtrips are fun and educative.

  • 1 May 2015 12:32 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Senior Director – Policy Analysis and Economics American Chemistry Council

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    My first introduction to energy issues and to NCAC was in 1998 when I joined the staff of the National Mining Association (NMA) as an economist. It was just after the Kyoto Protocol and climate change was the issue of the day. I’ve always been fascinated by networks, so energy economics was a natural extension. Following my time at NMA, I went to the American Chemistry Council. I had worked there briefly before going back to graduate school, so it was a homecoming of sorts. I swapped the energy producer perspective for that of an industrial energy consumer. Many are surprised to learn that chemical industry is the largest manufacturing consumer of natural gas and that shale gas development has made the US chemical industry more competitive than ever.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    I’m interested in the nexus between energy, the economy and the environment and how industry can transform energy into the products that improve living standards around the world.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    It’s a tall order, but I think the greatest challenge for our profession is finding and promoting the right balance between energy production/consumption and environmental stewardship while simultaneously raising the living standards for a growing global population.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I’ve been a member of the NCAC for about 15 years. NCAC brings in great experts on a range of topics of both personal and professional interest. In addition, I always enjoy the great conversation during the lunches. There is a tremendous diversity of research, experience, and perspective among the members. I have also benefited from the issue seminars and field trips.

  • 1 Apr 2015 12:06 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Former Energy Minister and Chairman of the Board State Oil Company in Chile, Former Alternative Executive Director The World Bank Group, and VP IAEE and Professor - Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    Ricardo Raineri is an economist and energy specialist with solid managerial and academic experience, and a strong background and practice in markets, institutional and financial issues. Has a wide-ranging advisory experience involving the energy and electric industries, addressing issues on the areas of business strategy, industrial organization, competition, antitrust and regulation, market structure and incentives, project valuation, corporate governance, and regional energy integration. Had held several academic positions and carried out extensive research work dealing with challenging energy and power generation issues in the areas of business and projects assessments, governance and public policy.

    Outstanding work experiences as: Energy Minister of Chile, responsible for the electric sector, alternative energy sources, and oil and gas sectors, which comprise public and private interests, and the relation with other ministries, the congress and the international relations on energy issues; Chairperson of the Board at the State Oil Company (ENAP), with operations in Chile, Argentina, Ecuador and Egypt, engaged in exploration, production, refining and logistic in oil and gas, and liquefied natural gas imports and distribution; Alternate Executive Director at the Board of the World Bank Group, representing Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay; Board member of the Chilean Council of State Companies, holding of 22 state companies in a wide range of sectors, for instance energy, ports, metro, railways, water utilities, mint, national lottery and other sectors of the economy; and Board member of private companies in the energy sector and private trust funds.

    Earned a Master and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota, and a Bachelor in Economics, Business Engineering and Master in Economics degrees from Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Professor at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Board member of Trust Funds, and Vice President of the International Association for Energy Economics (IAEE).

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    There are many achievements in my academic and professional career, but the ones that have been most significant for me are the opportunity I have had to lead initiatives which allowed low income people, in isolated areas, to have access to energy and electricity. For example, by the installation of a small hydropower plant.

    Other achievement that was important for energy security, after Argentina reduced natural gas exports to Chile in the last decade, was to have the chance to lead from the State Oil Company - ENAP -, a system to secure the supply of natural gas to the south of Chile.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    Energy security is an issue that in the years to come will be of increasing concern and complexity. Is a theme that needs the integration of many disciplines and skills, from geopolitical issues to overcome technological challenges. In a world where in a couple of decades we expect the population to reach 9 billion, and where living standards are rising, added with the threat of climate change, we will see an increasing pressure on the access to energy resources. This will demand huge investments, a favorable business environment and the reshaping of the multilateral institutional framework. It is within these challenges that cooperation within different countries and region is key for a secure and sustainable energy future. There is a lot to do, and in particular securing energy access, unlocking the rich energy resources of the whole of the Americas, and energy integration within the continent is a vast pending dilemma.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I joined NCAC in 2013 while I moved to the D.C. area. I have had a wonderful experience and quite surprise how active is NCAC. I really enjoyed its activities, luncheons, annual dinner, and other events such as field trips that help to create great relations within NCAC members.

    One of my first NCAC activities was when I went on the overnight field trip to Western Pennsylvania/Maryland to visit a coal plant, a wind farm, and a coal mine.

    If there is a place in D.C. to exchange ideas about energy issues this is NCAC.

  • 1 Mar 2015 12:35 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Spectrum Group International, Inc.

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    James R. (Jim) Johnson, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Spectrum Group International, Inc., earned a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Virginia Tech and an MBA degree from the University of Indianapolis. He is a Registered Professional Engineer.

    Jim has years of experience in working with electric utilities and related businesses, having served as a Project Engineer with Public Service Indiana (PSI), now a part of Duke Energy, in the areas of Engineering and System Planning. He served as Assistant General Manager and headed Engineering and Operations for Richmond Power and Light in Richmond, Indiana. He was Manager of Engineering and Construction and Engineering and Operations Support for Central Louisiana Electric Co., now Cleco Corporation. He also worked with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as a Member Relations Executive, recruiting members and assuring that member companies received good value for their investment in EPRI.

    Since February 2000, Jim has worked in his own business, Spectrum Group International, Inc. In that role, Jim has served as a Sales Rep for various companies that sell products and services into utilities; worked as an Intermediary in finding a buyer for a nuclear services company; and worked with a company to secure sludge and waste fiber from paper mills to use as a fuel in power plants. This last technology enabled utilizing remaining BTU content in waste paper bi-products, rather than land-filling it, producing electricity at a low cost.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    EPRI develops a lot of leading edge technologies that enable major improvements in the generation, transmission and distribution of electricity. One of the ways that Jim was successful in his job with EPRI was to help facilitate technology transfer. Benefits/Costs ratios of 5:1 were fairly typical, and sometimes were even higher. Projects that protect the environment and improve operating efficiencies pay big dividends.

    While serving as Acting Manager of EPRI’s Washington Office, Jim had an opportunity to testify before a Congressional Sub-committee on emerging generating technologies that were more environmental friendly. He has also testified before a number of State Public Utility Commissions regarding technologies.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    With intermittent energy sources such as wind, solar, tidal and small hydro, it is important to develop more efficient and economic energy storage systems. Also, it is important to not shut down too many nuclear and base load coal-fired plants prematurely due to environmental or economic concerns. These big units provide inertia to keep the electric grid up-and-running that the small renewable units just can’t perform. All of the parts of the system work together electro-mechanically. We need to get them to be in synch economically.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    Jim has been an NCAC member for 4-years. Jim signed up for the USAEE meeting being held in Washington, DC and became aware of NCAC through that meeting.

    Jim went on the Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Producing Operations Tour in October 2011, which was organized by NCAC for the USAEE meeting. The tour included a visit to Range Resources’ headquarters in Washington, PA, and visits to some of their drilling/fracking and gas processing sites. Range is very professional and well organized. They discussed the environmental issues around fracking and explained how they operate to protect the environment.

    One of the companies with which Jim was working at the time had an interest in “selling, rather than paying to land-fill” waste combustion products from fluidized-bed combustion coal-fired power plants for “fixing” sludge from gas drilling operations to make it environmentally safe to land-fill.

    "I have met a lot of people at the NCAC luncheons and meetings who I hold in high regard and now consider colleagues and friends. These get-togethers are well organized and provide good, timely information and networking opportunities that I highly recommend."

  • 1 Feb 2015 12:09 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    Retired, Deloitte

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    As reluctant as I am to admit it, I have over four decades of experience in the energy/environment professions. I started in the public utility valuation, depreciation and rates areas and later held positions in regulation at the state and federal levels and as both a consulting and utility executive. Last year I retired from Deloitte and have now ventured on my own in consulting. Nothing in my career was planned, just that one position led to another opportunity which led to another. While my university degree was in “Energy Conversion Engineering” from the University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee my first professional job at the American Appraisal Company was based on a single 3 credit course in “Public Utility Economics” taken as a junior in nuclear engineering at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. It was the only economics course I ever took. I still have the textbook and use it on occasion.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    Looking back I am proud of the fact that I was the first one to hold the title of “Environmental Engineer” at the Wisconsin Electric Power Company in 1973. The job mostly consisted of monitoring work by contract consultants working on the Clean Water Act of 1972 but I understood that energy and environment, always linked in the past, would become even more so in the future.

    In regulation my main achievements were, at the state level as a Wisconsin PSC Commissioner, in the processing successfully of numerous electric and natural gas rate cases of the early 1980’s. With double digit inflation and double digit interest rates, following the first Arab oil embargo, rate increase applications were “fast and furious.” The applications came fast and the public was furious. I survived long enough to vote on rate decreases in the later part of that decade. As A Commissioner at the FERC in 1992 my colleagues and I restructured the natural gas pipeline industry with Order 636. This order, which “unbundled” gas sales from gas transportation, resulted in a more efficient and healthy natural gas pipeline industry. It was a great decision.

    In your opinion, what are important economic/policy issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    Globally, society, including governments and the energy industry, still must bring electrical service to 1.4 billion of the world’s citizens and relieve 3.5 billion citizens of the daily burden of collecting wood and scrap biomass for daily fuel. Only 2 billion of seven billion people on earth today have reliable, affordable and secure energy services. Here in the USA, we still have issues concerning the design of wholesale electricity markets, compensatory retail rates, and rules and new distribution and transmission technologies for the accommodation of more intermittent renewable energy into the supply mix.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I have been a member the past dozen or so years and I wish I had joined sooner. My most memorable experience was the overnight trip to the first oil fields in Pennsylvania a few years ago. It was educational, intellectually stimulating and great fun as I got to know more of my NCAC colleagues on a personal basis.

    I have encouraged my colleagues at Deloitte as well as other professionals to join the NCAC because of the quality of the both the monthly luncheon programs and the membership. NCAC luncheons are a wonderful way to learn, expand one’s contacts in energy and make wonderful friendships. Can’t beat that, in my opinion.

  • 1 Jan 2015 12:17 AM | Anonymous member (Administrator)

    National Practice Leader - Gas, Deloitte MarketPoint

    Affiliation and years of experience in energy and/or environment:

    I’ve worked for the past 25 years in consulting, focusing primarily in energy and related issues. I am currently the natural gas practice leader for Deloitte MarketPoint. The predecessor company, Altos Management Partners, was acquired by Deloitte four years ago. It’s been great working with Deloitte’s global network of professionals and clients. What drew me to energy was the confluence of economic, societal, and geopolitical forces all at play in energy markets. It is fascinating to see how energy economics are shaping the geopolitical landscape and even give hope to nations. I worked on an energy project on one of my first assignments for a consulting firm after graduate school. I’ve been at it ever since.

    Any particular achievement/interest in energy/environment you would like to mention?

    I recently had the honor of testifying before a Congressional panel on LNG exports. It is exciting to be in the midst of a major upheaval in the industry as shale gas has turned everything upside down. I’m not sure the hearings accomplished anything, but it was quite an experience in any case. Oh, I also had an opportunity to work on a project for MidAmerican Energy, which is owned by Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway Company. My kids aren’t too impressed by anything I’ve done professionally, but they were excited to hear that Mr. Buffett reviewed one of my presentations.

    In your opinion, what are important issues facing the energy industry nowadays?

    I think it is communicating complex issues to the public and law makers in an environment that is increasingly politicized and polarized. We have a star culture in which celebrities are given platforms to speak about issues in which they are really unqualified. Politicians use issues to their own advantage. I know it’s always been this way to a degree, but it seems much worse now. It’s difficult to see how sound, economic decisions to complex problems can be made in this type of environment.

    How long have you been a member of NCAC? Any particular NCAC memory you would like to share with us?

    I’ve only been a member for four years, but I’ve been a member of USAEE on and off for a long time. I hope to be more involved in the future, but it is really difficult with my travel schedule. I really enjoy the dynamics of the NCAC gatherings. We have a wide range of experiences and affiliations. Of course, we get to talk about the most interesting issue: energy!

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software